Mamy Razafitsalama
2021

Mamy Razafitsalama

Conservationist

empowering communities

meet mamy

A dedicated conservationist and researcher, Mamy received his Maitrise de Recherche in Biological Anthropology (2008) and his Diplomes d’Etudes Approfondies in Primatology (2013) from the University of Antananarivo. His research focus was on the impact of habituation on the behavior and diet of nursing Coquerel’s sifaka (Propithecus coquereli) in Ankarafantsika National Park. As the in-country director of Planet Madagascar, his objective is to help his country solve problems around a growing humanitarian and conservation crisis. His aim is to assist communities that live in connection to the threatened species and vulnerable ecosystems and to create sustainable forests.

empowering communities
Nominated by: Travis Steffens FI'14
Class of 2021 Location Madagascar

The most meaningful aspect of my work is to help communities to save their own environment by providing permanent local full-time and part-time green jobs and to raise awareness and empower them to take ownership of the conservation issues facing the forest they rely upon. We help communities with immediate needs but also help address problems faced by the next generation. Madagascar is a global biodiversity hotspot country, which means a country that has incredible biodiversity coupled with high pressure that may lead to species extinctions.

“For the future, I would like to see local communities take ownership of the conservation activities needed to help conserve lemurs, protect the forest, and live sustainably in areas around Ankarafantsika National Park.”

- Mamy Razafitsalama

Madagascar is an underserved country suffering from a growing humanitarian and biodiversity crisis. Most people live in rural communities and rely on local resources to survive. Through employment in conservation and community development projects (e.g. fire management, forest restoration, and sustainable business enterprises), my work directly affects three underserved communities with around 500 people within Planet Madagascar’s management zone. We also work with additional communities surrounding Ankarafantsika National Parks. For example, we have conducted conservation education projects in forty communities. In these communities, we screened a film that we made aimed at raising awareness, protecting forest and animals from fire, and increasing hands-on biodiversity conservation. This film serves as an important conservation tool to educate the next generation on how saving the forest and animals benefits humans.

To improve my knowledge and ability to conduct conservation and community development programs, I recently trained in DESMAN 2020, a course run by Durrell Conservation Academy in Jersey, UK, and the University of Kent.

For the future, I would like to see local communities take ownership of the conservation activities needed to help conserve lemurs, protect the forest, and live sustainably in areas around Ankarafantsika National Park

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