Krithi Karanth
Author: Rolex / Marc Shoul
2024

Krithi Karanth

Conservation Scientist

rewilding communities and creating harmony with nature

meet krithi

Dr. Krithi Karanth, a visionary explorer and esteemed conservation scientist, hails from a lineage deeply dedicated to environmental stewardship. The daughter of a tiger biologist and conservationist, Karanth grew up with an abiding love for India’s natural wonders. By the age of two, she regularly saw tigers and leopards, at eight years old she was tracking tigers with her father, and by the time she was a teen she was out setting camera traps in the surrounding environment.

Armed with a Ph.D. in Environmental Science and Policy from Duke, a Master’s in Environmental Studies from Yale, and a B.S. and B.A. in Environmental Science and Geography from the University of Florida, she brings a formidable academic foundation to her pioneering work. Her research in India and Asia spans 25 years and encompasses many issues in human dimensions of wildlife conservation. She has conducted macro-level studies assessing patterns of species distributions and extinctions, impacts of wildlife tourism, consequences of voluntary resettlement, land use change, and understanding human-wildlife interactions. She has published 100+ scientific and popular articles.

rewilding communities and creating harmony with nature
Nominated by: Richard Garriott, LM'98
Class of 2024 Location India
Author: Rolex / Marc Shoul

Currently serving as the CEO and Chief Conservation Scientist at Centre for Wildlife Studies, Karanth is at the forefront of innovative conservation strategies that seamlessly blend technology with community involvement. Karanth’s impactful contributions have earned her numerous accolades, including the prestigious WINGS’ Women of Discovery Award, Eisenhower and Aspen Fellowships, and was awarded the Rolex Award for Enterprise in 2019. Recognized for her outstanding commitment to biodiversity conservation, she stands as a beacon in the field, actively shaping the narrative of wildlife preservation in India.

“I’m always an optimist and never give up. I think India is doing better now than it did 50 years ago. A lot of places are in trouble… a lot of species are in trouble, but we have technology and more public support for wildlife conservation. We have resources that the world didn’t have 10 years or 20 years ago. We just need to be smart about deploying them in time”

- Krithi Karanth
never stop exploring

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