Binbin Li
Author: Sonny Bas
2021

Binbin Li

Conservationist

Panda Protector

meet binbin

Binbin Li is an Assistant Professor at Duke Kunshan University, Kunshan, Jiangsu, China. She focuses on protected areas and endangered and endemic species conservation. Her studies include giant panda habitat and understanding the impacts of oil palm and rubber plantations on biodiversity in Southeast Asia. She also empowers young women to participate in scientific research and conservation work, and she is actively engaged in science communication and nature education. She is a popular writer and nature photographer with more than 400,000 followers in social media.

Panda Protector
Nominated by: Alexandra Sutton Lawrence TM'14
Class of 2021 Location China
Author: Wang Jingnan

Biodiversity is the foundation for ecological balance and the sustainable development of human society. However, biodiversity conservation may be treated as the opponent of development and cause huge conflicts. My work helps to identify key areas to set aside that better protect threatened and endemic species while reducing conflicts with local communities. I focus on certain flagship species, including giant pandas, not because they are cute, but because they help similar conservation problems to get more attention and support from the public and the government. Other species within the same habitat can benefit from the expansion of protected areas and the reduction of human disturbances.

“”The most meaningful aspect of my work is to show the existence of a way of living, and thus show possibilities. Many people understand that it is important to protect biodiversity but have no idea how to do it.”

- Binbin Li
Author: Zoe Jewell

Nature, with its biodiversity, is the inspiration for our society and the key to solving our societal problems. I aim to find the underlying mechanisms of nature-based solutions to solve challenges that we face today, such as poverty and health issues. The most meaningful aspect of my work is to show the existence of a way of living and thus show possibilities. Many people understand that it is important to protect biodiversity but have no idea how to do it. I feel like I am raising an army, the future generation to guard our Earth. By providing opportunities to recruit people for research and field studies, I engage young people, especially women, in conservation work. This offers them confidence. Creating a connection between nature and our hearts can connect the fate of biodiversity with our next generation. The most meaningful aspect of exploring wild places and the unknown is sharing this journey with many others.

never stop exploring

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