ANDREA JANE REID
Author: Collin Middleton
2023

ANDREA JANE REID

Indigenous Fisheries Scientist

Etuaptmumk – Two-eyed seeing

Meet Andrea

An assistant professor at the Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries at the University of British Columbia, Andrea Jane Reid is a citizen of the Nisa’a Nation and a descendant of the Gisk’aast/Killerwhale clan on the British Columbia–Alaska border. She has launched and now leads the Centre for Indigenous Fisheries, which is committed to research and teaching approaches that are intergenerational, land-based, and profoundly relational. Reid, who holds a PhD from Carleton University, is cofounder of Riparia, a Canadian charity that connects diverse young women with marine science to grow the next generation of water protectors.

Etuaptmumk – Two-eyed seeing
Nominated by: Rebecca Martin, FN'02
Class of 2023 Location Nisga'a Nation
Andrea Jane Reid interviews a Nisa’a Sigidimna’ (Matriarch) about the state of salmon in the Village of Ginolx
Andrea Jane Reid interviews a Nisa’a Sigidimna’ (Matriarch) about the state of salmon in the Village of Ginolx Author: Mikayla Wujec

My research—based on the essential premise that more knowledge is useful in solving critical and complex problems—challenges the outright exclusion of Indigenous knowledge systems from dominant fisheries research and management regimes employed globally. I have led a review of Indigenous conceptual frameworks from around the world that enable learning from multiple ways of knowing in parallel and focused on the Mi’kmaw concept of Etuaptmumk or “Two-Eyed Seeing”—that is, learning from Indigenous and Western sciences in tandem. This approach has educational resonance and is now being included in university syllabi across North America and abroad. 

“These narrow assessments of who is qualified and how, are effectively acts of gatekeeping in the academy that keep Indigenous representation and support low throughout the student experience – and this is the structure I am working endlessly to disrupt.”

- Andrea Jane Reid
Author: Mikayla Wujec

I have a strong commitment to the development of improved and innovative methods of practice, particularly around co-creation with Indigenous partners and in how research is subsequently disseminated. I also have a deep commitment to mentoring the next generation of scientists, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous. University policies often list requirements that recognize one measure of expertise (years of graduate education) while actively negating others (e.g., years serving one’s community as an elder, dedicated to knowledge transference). These narrow assessments of who is qualified and how are effectively acts of gatekeeping in academe that keep Indigenous representation and support low throughout the student experience. This is the structure I am working endlessly to disrupt.

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